New pictures of 237bhp Abarth 600e mark brand's 75th anniversary


Abarth has revealed new pictures of the hot 600e crossover as part of its 75th anniversary celebrations.

The Italian performance brand’s second electric car – based on the Fiat 600e – was shown for the first time a few weeks ago, but these new shots give a better look at its aggressive bodykit, lurid purple paintwork and bespoke styling cues ahead of its full debut in summer. 

Previously, the Ford Puma ST rival had only been shown from the front, but the rear end has now been revealed in full, sporting a chunky roof spoiler and a large, track-inspired diffuser that features Abarth’s scorpion logo.

The interior has been revealed, as well. Like the smaller Abarth 500e, it is fundamentally identical to that of the Fiat on which it is based, but with a raft of sporting-inspired add-ons that hint at its performance billing.

There are prominent Abarth graphics on the dashboard, for example, plus contrasting stitching for the sports-style seats and another scorpion on the Alcantara-wrapped steering wheel. The infotainment display receives Abarth-specific displays and menus, too. 

The hot 600e will feature the same external sound generator as the 500e, but is equipped with a “convenient point” to switch it on and off, rather than scrolling through the gauge cluster menus as in the smaller car. 

The striking Hypnotic Purple car pictured here is the Scorpionissima launch edition, just 1949 examples of which will be produced.

Sending 237bhp through the front axle, the 600e is described as “fiercely competitive and powerful” and will be the most powerful car based on Abarth parent company Stellantis’s e-CMP2 platform.

Abarth has yet to offer any performance figures, but we can be sure that it will comfortably outpace the Fiat on which it’s based, with a 0-62mph time in the region of 6.0sec.

Full technical specifications will be given at the car’s debut, but Abarth has already confirmed that it’s fitted with a limited-slip differential and performance tyres that – as implied by images of the car drifting on a race track – hint at an overt focus on dynamic engagement.



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